Two-thirds of people in Scotland ‘fear climate change’

7/12/2009 BBC Almost two-thirds of Scots believe climate change is an immediate and urgent problem, according to a poll commissioned by BBC Scotland.The survey suggested that a majority (63%) of people in Scotland believed immediate action was required. A further 20% described climate change as more of a problem for the future. Another 11% of [...]

See original: Resources for a sustainable future Two-thirds of people in Scotland ‘fear climate change’

Muller-Lyer Ticket Window

The original Müller-Lyer illusion is an optical illusion consisting of nothing more than an arrow. When viewers are asked to place a mark on the figure at the mid-point, they invariably place it more towards the tail end. Another variation, we often blogged about consists of two arrow-like figures, one with both ends pointing in, and the other with both ends pointing out. When asked to judge the lengths of the two lines, which are often equal, viewers will typically claim that the line with outward pointing arrows is longer. One possible explanation is that one sees the lines as three-dimensional, such as the outgoing and ingoing corners of a room. Another possible explanation is that the line with arrows pointing outwards may simply appear longer because the arrows themselves extend past the line. The other explanation could be simply because outward pointing arrows subliminally suggest that the line is growing.

One of the red vertical lines is actually longer. Can you tell which one is it?

One of the red vertical lines is actually longer. Can you tell which one is it?

In the example above, we used exactly the same surrounding suggested. In the Ticket Window Example, both arrows represent outgoing and ingoing corners of a room. It’s almost obvious that the ingoing corner’s arrow is much longer than the other. But look what happens if we fade the background and leave the arrows untouched. Shamefully, this didn’t make any difference. The right arrow still looks larger then the left one:

muller_lyer_tickets2
But when we further fade the background to the point where it almost become invisible, and even more important – if we completely cut the pointing arrow heads, the results are outstanding. Not only did we get the solution we thought we would (resulting with both lines becoming equal), surprisingly we find out that the left arrow was in fact lengthier than the ingoing corner’s one!

muller_lyer_tickets3



See original: Mighty Optical Illusions Muller-Lyer Ticket Window

Muller-Lyer Ticket Window

The original Müller-Lyer illusion is an optical illusion consisting of nothing more than an arrow. When viewers are asked to place a mark on the figure at the mid-point, they invariably place it more towards the tail end. Another variation, we often blogged about consists of two arrow-like figures, one with both ends pointing in, and the other with both ends pointing out. When asked to judge the lengths of the two lines, which are often equal, viewers will typically claim that the line with outward pointing arrows is longer. One possible explanation is that one sees the lines as three-dimensional, such as the outgoing and ingoing corners of a room. Another possible explanation is that the line with arrows pointing outwards may simply appear longer because the arrows themselves extend past the line. The other explanation could be simply because outward pointing arrows subliminally suggest that the line is growing.

One of the red vertical lines is actually longer. Can you tell which one is it?

One of the red vertical lines is actually longer. Can you tell which one is it?

In the example above, we used exactly the same surrounding suggested. In the Ticket Window Example, both arrows represent outgoing and ingoing corners of a room. It’s almost obvious that the ingoing corner’s arrow is much longer than the other. But look what happens if we fade the background and leave the arrows untouched. Shamefully, this didn’t make any difference. The right arrow still looks larger then the left one:

muller_lyer_tickets2
But when we further fade the background to the point where it almost become invisible, and even more important – if we completely cut the pointing arrow heads, the results are outstanding. Not only did we get the solution we thought we would (resulting with both lines becoming equal), surprisingly we find out that the left arrow was in fact lengthier than the ingoing corner’s one!

muller_lyer_tickets3

See original: Mighty Optical Illusions Muller-Lyer Ticket Window

@d7y @ngkx @iamSB I look at it more form the fun and creativity angle, although it must have been hard for chetan:-)

sandygautam: @d7y @ngkx @iamSB I look at it more form the fun and creativity angle, although it must have been hard for chetan:-)

See original: Twitter @d7y @ngkx @iamSB I look at it more form the fun and creativity angle, although it must have been hard for chetan:-)

Shocking OLPC Haiti Pilot Project Report From IADB

Finding an XO laptop spark

When the IDB plans to "evaluate its performance from a quantitative standpoint," it's a good sign that they mean to do just that. The XO project in Haiti, discussed here with a cost breakdown here is bearing a ton (1 pages, to be precise) fruit, with the recent IDB report (PDF).

It reveals some promise, some best practices, and also reminds us of some common problems.

From the "I toldya so" files

Somewhat unsurprisingly, there were some hassles in the basic deployment and daily use of the XOs which have been common topics of debate around OLPCNews.com for some time now, from dealing with shipping, hardware and infrastructure limitations, and the importance of teacher training.

See original: One Laptop Per Child News Shocking OLPC Haiti Pilot Project Report From IADB

check out latest edition of brain carnival encephalon, hosted at mouse trap blog http://bit.ly/58ydXv

sandygautam: check out latest edition of brain carnival encephalon, hosted at mouse trap blog http://bit.ly/58ydXv

See original: Twitter check out latest edition of brain carnival encephalon, hosted at mouse trap blog http://bit.ly/58ydXv

Encephalon #79: the year-end edition!

Answer this honestly:
1. Do you feel preoccupied with the encephalon (think about previous editions or anticipate next edition)?
2. Do you feel the need to read the encephalon with increasing number of contributions in order to achieve satisfaction?
3. Have you repeatedly made unsuccessful efforts to control, cut back, or stop reading encephalon?
4. Do you feel restless, [...]

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See original: The Mouse Trap Encephalon #79: the year-end edition!