lris: YouTube - Stress at Carleton College

lris
YouTube - Stress at Carleton College - http://www.youtube.com/watch...
YouTube - Stress at Carleton College
Andy Woodworth, Jàson Puçkett, Mr. Gunn and 10 other people liked this
"A 3 minute documentary on stress at Carleton College and the Silence Dance Party which takes place in the library the night before finals" - lris
The tradition is a new one and started since I arrived. But that's really cool about going to school with Ann! Ann's office is two down from mine. - lris
Tell her hi from Rebecca Swank, then! - Catherine Pellegrino

See original: FriendFeed - search lris: YouTube - Stress at Carleton College

When Liquids aren't so Liquid... [Starts With A Bang]

You don't understand. You can't just come to the Sea of Galilee and start walking on water. If you could, everybody would be doing it. You need to prepare yourself. -Walk on Water

As some of you may have noticed from looking at the site over the past few days, Scienceblogs has partnered with National Geographic. To celebrate this, I want to show you one of my favorite National Geographic clips of all time, showcasing the Central American Basilisk. (Its nickname? "The Jesus Lizard.") Why? You'll see...

This lizard weighs little enough, has feet with a big enough surface area, and can move quickly enough to walk on water! There is nothing special to it; if we were light enough, fast enough, and had large enough feet, we could do exactly the same thing.

073finchDM_468x307.jpg

Of course, we're not. But you're familiar with water acting like a solid, even if you don't know it. What would happen if you jumped out of an airplane and your parachute didn't open? Would landing over a lake be any better for you than landing on dry land?

_42566451_parachute_416.jpg

Of course not; on an extreme enough timescale, any fluid can act like a solid, and any solid can act like a liquid! Don't believe it? Take some silly putty, roll it into a ball, and throw it against a wall. It'll bounce, acting like a solid! Now take that ball of silly putty, and put it on a flat surface with a hole in it. And wait a few minutes. You should start to see it act like a liquid, like this.

sillyputtydrip.jpg

Physicists call materials that are in-between solids and liquids like this non-Newtonian fluids. They are some of the most fun you can have, if you can get enough of them. My personal favorite? Cornstarch + water. What can you do with enough of it? Remember the basilisk?

So in general: interact quickly enough and something will act like a solid; slow down the timescale of interaction and it will act like a liquid. Even rocks, over millions of years, can flow like liquids! So the next time someone teaches you those hard divisions between solids, liquids, and gasses, you'll know that those lines are a lot fuzzier depending on how much patience you've got!

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Also check out the featured ScienceBlog of the week: Applied Statistics

See original: ScienceBlogs Select When Liquids aren't so Liquid... [Starts With A Bang]

091207_Google_TonyHawk_DE_H264.mov

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Shocking OLPC Haiti Pilot Project Report From IADB

Finding an XO laptop spark

When the IDB plans to "evaluate its performance from a quantitative standpoint," it's a good sign that they mean to do just that. The XO project in Haiti, discussed here with a cost breakdown here is bearing a ton (1 pages, to be precise) fruit, with the recent IDB report (PDF).

It reveals some promise, some best practices, and also reminds us of some common problems.

From the "I toldya so" files

Somewhat unsurprisingly, there were some hassles in the basic deployment and daily use of the XOs which have been common topics of debate around OLPCNews.com for some time now, from dealing with shipping, hardware and infrastructure limitations, and the importance of teacher training.

See original: One Laptop Per Child News Shocking OLPC Haiti Pilot Project Report From IADB

OLPC's Netbook Impact on Laptop PC Industry

I will list the ways in which OLPC has influenced the target market which probably defines the interest of most readers of OLPC News, the angle from which most bloggers and industry commentators have been talking about the OLPC project for the past 4 years, which is how OLPC technology may affect the rich Western country's PC/Laptop industry.

Said in another way, how OLPC has influenced the whole bunch of adults in rich countries reading Engadget and Gizmodo egoistically thinking: "When can I buy and use this for myself". These are the PC/Laptop industry related developments of the last 4 years that we can thank OLPC for:

1. Windows XP would have been discontinued in 2007 or 2008 as was Microsoft's original plan. Every so often, Microsoft would release a new OS requiring more powerful hardware to even run the same apps, all being one scheme that Microsoft and Intel have been cooperating on for decades, to make it so that consumers would buy a new computer every 2-3 years or so. Wintel and the PC industry really needed Windows Vista to generate a whole lot of new revenues, profits and sale. But OLPC helped stop it and Windows XP is still for sale.

2. The Windows XP licence for netbooks was lowered to $30 per device. Until then, Microsoft had never licensed Windows for less than $60 per unit, even in bulk to OEM manufacturers. Microsoft has even declared that the Windows XP licence was to be only $3 in third world countries. All that thanks to the pressure from Linux OS in netbooks which was kick-started by the OLPC project.

See original: One Laptop Per Child News OLPC's Netbook Impact on Laptop PC Industry

Things Talk - Creative Climate Camp

Watch the COP15 Behind the Scenes video about the "Creative Climate Camp" in Copenhagen, December 4, 2009.
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The scientist role in policy-making, part 459 [The Island of Doubt]

William "Stoat" Connolley draws our attention to a couple of essays by Mike Hulme of the University of East Anglia climate team on the role of climatologists -- and scientists in general -- in the policy-making process. I have to agree with William, it's not exactly clear just what Hulme is getting at. Some excellent points are raised, though, and the essays are worthwhile fodder for thought as the Copenhagen conference begins.

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Also check out the featured ScienceBlog of the week: Applied Statistics

See original: ScienceBlogs Select The scientist role in policy-making, part 459 [The Island of Doubt]

D0r0th34: 'One of the bioscientists asked the data storage firm used by one of the labs recently about the costs associated with accessing data from studies conducted a few years ago. The company replied, "you wouldn’t want to pay us to do that. It w

D0r0th34
'One of the bioscientists asked the data storage firm used by one of the labs recently about the costs associated with accessing data from studies conducted a few years ago. The company replied, "you wouldn’t want to pay us to do that. It would be less expensive to re-run your experiments."' Holy WTF, Batman.
Paul Bacchus, Steve Koch, suelibrarian and 6 other people liked this
Oh my! - Katy S
See also "don't keep the raw data because if you do and we get into a patent dispute it will all be discoverable. Much cheaper to re-do experiments than pay lawyers to look at them..." - Cameron Neylon

See original: FriendFeed - search D0r0th34: 'One of the bioscientists asked the data storage firm used by one of the labs recently about the costs associated with accessing data from studies conducted a few years ago. The company replied, "you wouldn’t want to pay us to do that. It w

John Dupuis: I'm on the search committee for a new dean of the Faculty of Science & Engineering here at York and we're at the stage where we're coming up with interview questions. I'd like to throw a couple of open access/open source/open science/ope

John Dupuis
I'm on the search committee for a new dean of the Faculty of Science & Engineering here at York and we're at the stage where we're coming up with interview questions. I'd like to throw a couple of open access/open source/open science/open data/scholarly communications questions into the mix. I'd really appreciate input from all of you out there:
Mr. Gunn and OpenSci Info liked this
If you could ask a potential dean any scholarly communications question, what would it be? - John Dupuis
Try to frame the question while also providing information -- "There are many misunderstandings about Open Access publishing such as /OA archiving will kill journal subscriptions/, /OA is essentially a vanity press service/ or /OA is about punishing greedy or obstructive publishers/. What do you feel is the best way to counter these false assumptions?" [Note: taken from http://www.arl.org/sparc...] - joe is...
In your opinion, would open science A) Allow the department to make more effective use of research funds? B)Get higher scores on the "broader impacts" portion of grant applications? http://friendfeed.com/science... C) Mitigate the risk of any possible future data provenance research scandals? - Mr. Gunn

See original: FriendFeed - search John Dupuis: I'm on the search committee for a new dean of the Faculty of Science & Engineering here at York and we're at the stage where we're coming up with interview questions. I'd like to throw a couple of open access/open source/open science/ope

Another week of GW News, December 6, 2009 [A Few Things Ill Considered]

Logging the Onset of The Bottleneck Years


This weekly posting is brought to you courtesy of H. E. Taylor. Happy reading, I ho8pe you enjoy this week's Global Warming news roundup

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Also check out the featured ScienceBlog of the week: Applied Statistics

See original: ScienceBlogs Select Another week of GW News, December 6, 2009 [A Few Things Ill Considered]

OLPC's Netbook Impact on Laptop PC Industry

I will list the ways in which OLPC has influenced the target market which probably defines the interest of most readers of OLPC News, the angle from which most bloggers and industry commentators have been talking about the OLPC project for the past 4 years, which is how OLPC technology may affect the rich Western country's PC/Laptop industry.

Said in another way, how OLPC has influenced the whole bunch of adults in rich countries reading Engadget and Gizmodo egoistically thinking: "When can I buy and use this for myself". These are the PC/Laptop industry related developments of the last 4 years that we can thank OLPC for:

1. Windows XP would have been discontinued in 2007 or 2008 as was Microsoft's original plan. Every so often, Microsoft would release a new OS requiring more powerful hardware to even run the same apps, all being one scheme that Microsoft and Intel have been cooperating on for decades, to make it so that consumers would buy a new computer every 2-3 years or so. Wintel and the PC industry really needed Windows Vista to generate a whole lot of new revenues, profits and sale. But OLPC helped stop it and Windows XP is still for sale.

2. The Windows XP licence for netbooks was lowered to $30 per device. Until then, Microsoft had never licensed Windows for less than $60 per unit, even in bulk to OEM manufacturers. Microsoft has even declared that the Windows XP licence was to be only $3 in third world countries. All that thanks to the pressure from Linux OS in netbooks which was kick-started by the OLPC project.

See original: One Laptop Per Child News OLPC's Netbook Impact on Laptop PC Industry

Two-thirds of people in Scotland ‘fear climate change’

7/12/2009 BBC Almost two-thirds of Scots believe climate change is an immediate and urgent problem, according to a poll commissioned by BBC Scotland.The survey suggested that a majority (63%) of people in Scotland believed immediate action was required. A further 20% described climate change as more of a problem for the future. Another 11% of [...]

See original: Resources for a sustainable future Two-thirds of people in Scotland ‘fear climate change’

Muller-Lyer Ticket Window

The original Müller-Lyer illusion is an optical illusion consisting of nothing more than an arrow. When viewers are asked to place a mark on the figure at the mid-point, they invariably place it more towards the tail end. Another variation, we often blogged about consists of two arrow-like figures, one with both ends pointing in, and the other with both ends pointing out. When asked to judge the lengths of the two lines, which are often equal, viewers will typically claim that the line with outward pointing arrows is longer. One possible explanation is that one sees the lines as three-dimensional, such as the outgoing and ingoing corners of a room. Another possible explanation is that the line with arrows pointing outwards may simply appear longer because the arrows themselves extend past the line. The other explanation could be simply because outward pointing arrows subliminally suggest that the line is growing.

One of the red vertical lines is actually longer. Can you tell which one is it?

One of the red vertical lines is actually longer. Can you tell which one is it?

In the example above, we used exactly the same surrounding suggested. In the Ticket Window Example, both arrows represent outgoing and ingoing corners of a room. It’s almost obvious that the ingoing corner’s arrow is much longer than the other. But look what happens if we fade the background and leave the arrows untouched. Shamefully, this didn’t make any difference. The right arrow still looks larger then the left one:

muller_lyer_tickets2
But when we further fade the background to the point where it almost become invisible, and even more important – if we completely cut the pointing arrow heads, the results are outstanding. Not only did we get the solution we thought we would (resulting with both lines becoming equal), surprisingly we find out that the left arrow was in fact lengthier than the ingoing corner’s one!

muller_lyer_tickets3



See original: Mighty Optical Illusions Muller-Lyer Ticket Window