4th symposium on empirical software engineering and measurement (ESEM 2010)

CALL FOR PAPERS



ESEM 2010

4th Symposium on Empirical Software Engineering and Measurement

September 16-17 2010, Bolzano-Bozen, Italy

http://esem2010.case.unibz.it



IMPORTANT DATES:

Submission of full papers: March 1 2010

Notification: April 30, 2010



The objective of the IEEE International Symposium on

Empirical Software Engineering and Measurement (ESEM)

is to provide a forum where researchers and practitioners can report and

discuss recent research results in the areas of empirical software engineering

and software measurement.



The symposium encourages the exchange of ideas that help communicate

the strengths and weaknesses of software engineering's technologies and

[More...]

See original: Eventseer.net - the academic event tracker 4th symposium on empirical software engineering and measurement (ESEM 2010)

@ScepticGeek how stupid of me...nthi sjuts slippedpast me...now using sendto

sandygautam: @ScepticGeek how stupid of me...nthi sjuts slippedpast me...now using sendto

See original: Twitter @ScepticGeek how stupid of me...nthi sjuts slippedpast me...now using sendto

@ScepticGeek there is no ntaive send to in Reader. R u using some script/add-on?

sandygautam: @ScepticGeek there is no ntaive send to in Reader. R u using some script/add-on?

See original: Twitter @ScepticGeek there is no ntaive send to in Reader. R u using some script/add-on?

@chriswebb Yes, wasn't assuming you were, just wondering if that view was mentioned to the authors.

mrgunn: @chriswebb Yes, wasn't assuming you were, just wondering if that view was mentioned to the authors.

See original: Twitter @chriswebb Yes, wasn't assuming you were, just wondering if that view was mentioned to the authors.

Journalists on Twitter - Breaking News, Politics, Opinion and more - Muck Rack http://ff.im/cVwy3

mrgunn: Journalists on Twitter - Breaking News, Politics, Opinion and more - Muck Rack http://ff.im/cVwy3

See original: Twitter Journalists on Twitter - Breaking News, Politics, Opinion and more - Muck Rack http://ff.im/cVwy3

how soon before google announces native twitter sharing from reader and I can do away with reader2twit also!

sandygautam: how soon before google announces native twitter sharing from reader and I can do away with reader2twit also!

See original: Twitter how soon before google announces native twitter sharing from reader and I can do away with reader2twit also!

migrated all my feeds from twitterfeeder to native google feedburner for auto twitter posting.

sandygautam: migrated all my feeds from twitterfeeder to native google feedburner for auto twitter posting.

See original: Twitter migrated all my feeds from twitterfeeder to native google feedburner for auto twitter posting.

Climate Change (collection)

Not Honour, Your Honour http://j.mp/6qu3US

sandygautam: Not Honour, Your Honour http://j.mp/6qu3US

See original: Twitter Not Honour, Your Honour http://j.mp/6qu3US

The Question of Who "Chooses" To Participate In Clinical Trials [Thus Spake Zuska]

Is the current economy making more people want to participate in human research studies, asks Isis?

In this new study here at MRU, we began advertising online last Wednesday. By Friday, my study coordinator had received 300 responses...I can't help but wonder if the current poor economy is driving more people to consider human research.

Probably - I wouldn't be at all surprised. It seems possible to me, though, that is just an exacerbation of the situation that obtained previously - which is that poorer people have always been attracted to participation in clinical research trials either as a means of making money, or as a means of obtaining at least some sort of health care, even though clinical studies are most definitely not about providing health care to the participants. That may be the other motivator for Isis's applicants. Many people don't really understand that clinical trials are not really places to receive health care.

When I worked in the pharmaceutical industry, a few of my coworkers seemed to have fuzzy ethics around this point, too. At least one of my coworkers was explicit in his belief that it was an ancillary "benefit" for clinical trial participants to obtain the attentions of medical professionals during a clinical trial. He insisted on referring to participants as "patients" rather than "subjects" (which I think is the preferred and correct term).

If you are wealthy, or even reasonable well-off, you have access to the best already-tested and approved health care and treatments on offer. Or you can figure out how to work the system and get yourself into Phase III clinical trials if your medical situation is such that there are no good tested options available out there. What you most likely aren't doing is saying to yourself, "Hey! I could make fifty bucks if I sign up for this Phase I clinical trial, AND I'll be helping out science, AND maybe I'll finally get my blood pressure checked by a real doctor, too!"

I appreciate Dr. Isis's sense of unease over the recent recruitment phenomenon. But I think it is just foregrounding an issue that has been there all along.

Thought experiment: Sometimes I have imagined a society where everyone is eligible for, and required to, participate in clinical research, akin to jury duty, or maybe like military service in Israel. Only when you were called up, you'd be assigned to a research study that was a good "match" - if you are healthy, you go into a Phase I or II; if you have a medical problem, you go into some relevant Phase III. Spread the risks and responsibilities out across the society regardless of social glass, gender, race. Of course its unworkable, but what would be the pros and cons of such a system? What things would need to change radically to make it work? Would drug development research need to move largely out of the hands of private industry or could it stay pretty much as it is?

Note I am not advocating for such a system, just floating it as a thought experiment to examine how we do things now and how we might do them differently. I have participated in clinical trials - as a student, just to get the money; as a researcher, with the goal of bringing a new therapy for a disease to market; and as a patient, in the hopes of helping doctors come to a better understanding of my particular illness. I've helped someone else gain entry to a clinical research study because no other available therapies were helping this person and we hoped the study therapy (it was open label) would work (it did provide partial relief that has persisted over time). So I've seen them from a variety of perspectives. The best-planned study in the world can be left with misleading results if participants are overly motivated by money, or by the hope of obtaining medical treatment for illness.

Read the comments on this post...

Also check out the featured ScienceBlog of the week: Guilty Planet

See original: ScienceBlogs Select The Question of Who "Chooses" To Participate In Clinical Trials [Thus Spake Zuska]

Centrosaurions, cabras y calaos... solucionando las diferencias a cabezazos

La entrada de hoy tiene algo de especial para mí por dos motivos. Primero, nunca pensé que yo iba a dedicarme un día a escribir una cosa seria sobre investigación realizada con fósiles de dinosaurios. Y segundo, lo que sí que jamás se me pasó por la imaginación es que un artículo científico sobre dinosaurios iba a citar alguno de mis trabajos... Sin embargo, hoy rompo esas líneas de pensamiento definitivamente pues precisamente es lo que ha pasado.Concretamente, voy a hablar sobre un interesante trabajo de interpretación de las estructuras óseas existentes en un grupo de dinosaurios conocidos cono centrosaurinos:Hieronymus, T.L., Witmer, L.M., Tanke, D.H., Currie, P.J. (2009) The Facial Integument of Centrosaurine Ceratopsids: Morphological and Histological Correlates of Novel Skin Structures. The Anatomical Record-Advances In Integrative Anatomy And Evolutionary Biology, 292: 1370-1396. Lo primero, quizás, sería explicar quiénes son los centrosaurinos... para los que no somos dinomaniacos... Pues se trata de un grupo monofilético de dinosaurios ceratópsidos, que conforman el grupo hermano de los Triceratops y similares. La principal característica de los centrosaurinos es la presencia de una serie de estructuras oseas nasales de gran desarrollo y morfología muy variada. Entre los más famosos de sus integrantes se encuentran Styracosaurus, con su gola rodeada de grandes espinas (ver arriba la reconstrucción de Sergio Pérez González), Pachyrhinosaurus, con sus rugosidades nasales de interpretación discutida, o Centrosaurus, con su robusto cuerno nasal. La gran similitud estructural entre las ornamentaciones "corniformes" de los dinosaurios ceratopsios y las de los mamíferos ha llevado en numerosas ocasiones a los investigadores a establecer relaciones funcionales con similares implicaciones paleobiológicas (competición intraespecífica, selección sexual, reconocimiento de especie). Pero además de los cuernos, algunos centrosaurinos presentan una superficie rugosa de hueso que ha sustituido al cuerno nasal, y estos son precisamente los más derivados filogenéticamente. Por ello, el estudio de la transición entre una morfología y la otra puede arrojar luz sobre los patrones evolutivos en juego en este grupo. Y ese es el punto de partida de este trabajo.Son dos las principales hipótesis planteadas para explicar las rugosidades nasales de Pachyrhinosaurus. La primera infiere la existencia de un gran cuerno de queratina similar al de los rinocerontes actuales, el cual podría servir como señal visual o como "arma" en la competencia por las hembras. La segunda supone la presencia de una superficie callosa que serviría como "ariete" durante las luchas entre machos, de modo similar a como hacen hoy en día las iguanas marinas de las Islas Galápagos. Ambas interpretaciones favorecen la selección sexual o social como factor evolutivo primordial en el desarrollo de estas estructuras. En este trabajo también se plantean otras poibilidades, como pueden ser la aparición de cuernos huecos de tipo casco (como los de los calaos del Sureste asiático) o de estructuras dérmicas osificadas.Pero en cualquier caso, como la función de esas estructuras no se puede conocer directamente, ya que estos bichos se extinguieron hace sus buenos 65 millones de años (y más), lo que han acometido Hyeronimus y sus colaboradores es un análisis de estructuras óseas similares en vertebrados actuales en relación con la función que desempeñan (particularmente, las luchas entre machos por medio del choque de cabezas). De esa manera han podido llegar a ver si existe una relación real entre la estructura y su supuesta función, pues si no la hubiese entonces la adaptación propuesta no habría sido imprecindible para que se generasen esas estructuras.La parte descriptiva del estudio es extraordinariamente exhaustiva y genera una visión novedosa sobre el aspecto que tendrían las cabezas de estos animales, presentando una multitud de diferentes ornamentaciones dérmicas asociadas a los diferentes tipos de extructuras óseas que se encuentran en sus cráneos.La parte interpretativa sobre la función de estas diferentes estructuras se basa en estudios de las relaciones filogenéticas de diferentes grupos de bóvidos y calaos acuales para poder establecer una correlación estadística entre estructura y función. Los resultados sugieren que, ciertamente, hay una relación entre las luchas de machos y las rugosidades de la superficie ósea craneal que recibe los impactos del rival. Por tanto, las estructuras nasales de Pachyrhinosaurus podrían tener un análogo morfofuncional en los bueyes almizcleros actuales (Ovibos), que tienen similares superficies rugosas en el hueso frontal. De hecho, los autores incluso presentan un escenario evolutivo para la transición entre los cuernos largos y rectos de los centrosaurinos basales y las estructuras planas y rugosas de los más derivados. Esta se haría a través de los cuernos curvados antero-ventralmente de, por ejemplo, Einiosaurus, los cuales, debido a esa curvatura serían más robustos y podrían soportar los choques directos de las cabezas de los machos contrincantes (igual que los cuernos de los muflones actuales). Este comportamiento se afianzaría y finalmente favorecería el desarrollo...

Hieronymus, T., Witmer, L., Tanke, D., & Currie, P. (2009) The Facial Integument of Centrosaurine Ceratopsids: Morphological and Histological Correlates of Novel Skin Structures. The Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology, 292(9), 1370-1396. DOI: 10.1002/ar.20985  The Facial Integument of Centrosaurine Ceratopsids: Morphological and Histological Correlates of Novel Skin Structures


See original: Research Blogging - All Topics - Spanish Centrosaurions, cabras y calaos... solucionando las diferencias a cabezazos