How did flowering plants evolve to dominate Earth?

To Charles Darwin it was an 'abominable mystery' and it is a question which has continued to vex evolutionists to this day: when did flowering plants evolve and how did they come to dominate plant life on earth?


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See original: Science News How did flowering plants evolve to dominate Earth?

Preventing repeat strokes — are survivors taking their medicine?

San Diego, CA, December 1, 2009 -- Since 1999, stroke survivors have been advised to use aspirin, prescription antiplatelet agents, or prescription anticoagulants to help avoid another stroke. Many large surveys of the U.S.


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See original: Science News Preventing repeat strokes — are survivors taking their medicine?

Shape shifters: Researchers create new breed of antennas

Antennas aren't just for listening to the radio anymore. They're used in everything from cell phones to GPS devices. Research from North Carolina State University is revolutionizing the field of antenna design -- creating shape-shifting antennas that open the door to a host of new uses in fields ranging from public safety to military deployment.


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See original: Science News Shape shifters: Researchers create new breed of antennas

Elsevier announces the November 2009 issue of Reproductive Health Matters on criminalization

Amsterdam, 01 December 2009 -- Elsevier announced today the publication of the November issue of Reproductive Health Matters.


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See original: Science News Elsevier announces the November 2009 issue of Reproductive Health Matters on criminalization

Careful diagnosis helps fracture patients put best foot forward

ROSEMONT, IL -- Located in areas of the foot that can be hard to visualize with X-rays and other imaging techniques, injuries to the ankle area of the foot are the most frequently misdiagnosed of all foot fractures. Delayed diagnosis can have serious consequences, sometimes leading to permanent disability.


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See original: Science News Careful diagnosis helps fracture patients put best foot forward

Social media use in the United States: implications for health communication.

J Med Internet Res. 2009; 11(4): e48
Chou WY, Hunt YM, Beckjord EB, Moser RP, Hesse BW

BACKGROUND: Given the rapid changes in the communication landscape brought about by participative Internet use and social media, it is important to develop a better understanding of these technologies and their impact on health communication. The first step in this effort is to identify the characteristics of current social media users. Up-to-date reporting of current social media use will help monitor the growth of social media and inform health promotion/communication efforts aiming to effectively utilize social media. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study is to identify the sociodemographic and health-related factors associated with current adult social media users in the United States. METHODS: Data came from the 2007 iteration of the Health Information National Trends Study (HINTS, N = 7674). HINTS is a nationally representative cross-sectional survey on health-related communication trends and practices. Survey respondents who reported having accessed the Internet (N = 5078) were asked whether, over the past year, they had (1) participated in an online support group, (2) written in a blog, (3) visited a social networking site. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify predictors of each type of social media use. RESULTS: Approximately 69% of US adults reported having access to the Internet in 2007. Among Internet users, 5% participated in an online support group, 7% reported blogging, and 23% used a social networking site. Multivariate analysis found that younger age was the only significant predictor of blogging and social networking site participation; a statistically significant linear relationship was observed, with younger categories reporting more frequent use. Younger age, poorer subjective health, and a personal cancer experience predicted support group participation. In general, social media are penetrating the US population independent of education, race/ethnicity, or health care access. CONCLUSIONS: Recent growth of social media is not uniformly distributed across age groups; therefore, health communication programs utilizing social media must first consider the age of the targeted population to help ensure that messages reach the intended audience. While racial/ethnic and health status-related disparities exist in Internet access, among those with Internet access, these characteristics do not affect social media use. This finding suggests that the new technologies, represented by social media, may be changing the communication pattern throughout the United States.

See original: HubMed - blog Social media use in the United States: implications for health communication.

Mitosis and cellularization of syncytial embryo

This early embryo of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, expresses fluorescently labeled proteins to detect DNA and plasma membrane dynamics. As the embryo develops, its DNA is replicated and divided over and over again to rapidly generate thousands of cells. Within each membrane bound compartment shown here, replicated DNA from one nucleus aligns and then divides to make two daughter nuclei. Sokac et al., Developmental Cell 14(5), 775-786. www.cell.com www.cell.com ... mitosis and ...
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ERK’s got rhythm: Protein that controls cell growth found to cycle in and out of cell nucleus

RICHLAND, Wash. -- Time-lapsed video of individual breast tissue cells reveals a never-before-seen event in the life of a cell: a protein that cycles between two major compartments in the cell. The results give researchers a more complete view of the internal signals that cause breast tissue cells to grow, events that go awry in cancer and are targets of drug development.


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See original: Science News ERK’s got rhythm: Protein that controls cell growth found to cycle in and out of cell nucleus

Golden eagles get more protection

Six new golden eagle protection areas in the north and west of Scotland are proposed by the Scottish government.

See original: Earth | Earth News Golden eagles get more protection

Gay Men Allowed to Donate Blood (in Theory) [Aardvarchaeology]

AIDS was discovered in gay men and the virus is more easily transmitted through anal than vaginal intercourse. For this reason, gay men (defined as "men who have sex with men") have long been forbidden to donate blood in Sweden. Likewise, people who go to bed with a new hetero partner must wait three months before donating blood again.

Now the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare has decided to change the rules. A bit. Gay men are now allowed to donate blood. If the last time they had sex with a man was more than a year ago. So you're only allowed to donate blood if you're gay in the abstract, not in practice.

I don't know what to think here. The changed rules are certainly more symbolic than practical in effect. But the virus is much more common among gay men than among heteros. And among blood donors who have showed up as positive in HIV screening, gay men are also strongly over-represented. (But they're not allowed to donate in the first place, so I don't know where those data come from.)

Still, regardless of who has it more and who has it less, the virus is very uncommon overall in Sweden, and those infected get good treatment that keeps their infectiousness way, way down. I don't know what's the bigger risk here: people dying from lack of donated blood or people contracting HIV from an infected blood bag.

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