@techberto where is/was this zipper?

EvoMRI: @techberto where is/was this zipper?

See original: Twitter @techberto where is/was this zipper?

Remembering who's the grown-up http://j.mp/5NVTgZ

sandygautam: Remembering who's the grown-up http://j.mp/5NVTgZ

See original: Twitter Remembering who's the grown-up http://j.mp/5NVTgZ

Are "orchid kids" the same as "gifted children"? [Neuron Culture]

Over at the Times Magazine Motherlode blog, Lisa Belkin ran a short post about my Atlantic "Orchid Children" piece a couple days ago, and some of the responses she got strike to an issue that has come up quite a few other places. I posted a note on this at Motherlode, and wanted to expand on it a bit here as well. This is the first what may be several posts of the "FAQ" sort examining reader or blogger concerns.

In this case, the concern dominating the Motherlode commenter thread responses, and in a few other places as well, is whether the "Orchid Children" of my title are what many people call "gifted" children (defined roughly as very smart kids who have behavioral issues requiring some special handling). The short answer to this question -- that is, whether by "orchid children" I mean smart-but-difficult -- is No.

Read the rest of this post... |

Read the comments on this post...

Also check out the featured ScienceBlog of the week: Neurotopia

See original: ScienceBlogs Select Are "orchid kids" the same as "gifted children"? [Neuron Culture]

Our cooperative behavior is innate. http://j.mp/6RhyTI

sandygautam: Our cooperative behavior is innate. http://j.mp/6RhyTI

See original: Twitter Our cooperative behavior is innate. http://j.mp/6RhyTI

Liked "Real Hartford » A Sustainable City" http://ff.im/cFrkR

EvoMRI: Liked "Real Hartford » A Sustainable City" http://ff.im/cFrkR

See original: Twitter Liked "Real Hartford » A Sustainable City" http://ff.im/cFrkR

Growing North-South Divide in Copenhagen over Kyoto [The Primate Diaries]

Executive Director of the South Center Martin Khor and Journalist Naomi Klein are interviewed in Copenhagen:

Martin Khor: I think that the US has a positive role to play in the climate negotiations, which it has yet to play, by allowing those countries who are in the Kyoto Protocol--and that's all the developed countries except the US--to remain there and to take their commitments there and to take high commitments there to reduce their emissions by at least 40 percent. . .

Now, the reverse is happening, as we have seen in the Danish text, that those developed countries in the Kyoto Protocol with high commitments are on the verge of jumping ship to join the United States, where the US is not willing to commit to an international treaty at the moment and is giving a very low commitment figure of reducing its emissions by about four percent between 1990 and 2020, when the science says we have to do it by at least 25 to 40 percent, preferably 40 percent, and Europe is willing to do 30 percent. So it looks as if the other countries are watching the United States and saying that if the US is going to do so little and is not going to be internationally legally bound, then we are all going to follow the United States in a race, if not to the bottom, to very near the bottom. And this is what is at the heart of the crisis in the negotiation.

Read more about the "Danish text"

Read the rest of this post... |

Read the comments on this post...

Also check out the featured ScienceBlog of the week: Neurotopia

See original: ScienceBlogs Select Growing North-South Divide in Copenhagen over Kyoto [The Primate Diaries]

Willis Eschenbach caught lying about temperature trends [Deltoid]

Remember how the New Zealand Climate Science Coalition made the warming trend in New Zealand go away by treating measurements from different sites as if they came from the same site? Well, Willis Eschenbach has followed in their foot steps by using the same scam on Australian data. He claims that for Darwin "the trend has been artificially increased to give a false warming where the raw data shows cooling". Here's his graph:

fig_7-ghcn-averages.png

That blue line for raw temperature in his graph combines different records without any adjustment, even though Eschenbach could see that there was a step change between record 0 and record 1.

The adjustment procedure used is described here, with the the authors noting:

A great deal of effort went into the homogeneity adjustments. Yet the
effects of the homogeneity adjustments on global average temperature
trends are minor (Easterling and Peterson 1995b). However, on scales
of half a continent or smaller, the homogeneity adjustments can have
an impact. On an individual time series, the effects of the
adjustments can be enormous. These adjustments are the best we could
do given the paucity of historical station history metadata on a
global scale. But using an approach based on a reference series
created from surrounding stations means that the adjusted station's
data is more indicative of regional climate change and less
representative of local microclimatic change than an individual
station not needing adjustments.

Eschenbach, however, simply declares the NOAA's adjustments "blatantly bogus" that created a "false warming". This isn't a strong argument, but maybe there is a way to check the NOAA's work?

Oh look, here's the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's high quality climate data for Darwin aiport

darwintemp.png

Read the rest of this post... |

Read the comments on this post...

Also check out the featured ScienceBlog of the week: Neurotopia

See original: ScienceBlogs Select Willis Eschenbach caught lying about temperature trends [Deltoid]

Questioning Sustainable Eating [The World's Fair]

I mean that title in the positive sense of critique, like Kantian critique, intended to question so as to make better. I made note last month of a project some students here were doing, called "Is It Possible to Eat Sustainably at the University of Virginia?" This was the prompt:

Four Students set out to determine if it is possible to eat sustainably at UVA. Elizabeth will cover going vegetarian, Michael will cover going organic, Will will cover "The Six Dollar Limit", and Avik will cover going local. The conclusions of all four of us will help determine if eating sustainably is a viable option here at the University of Virginia.

Today, The Atlantic Monthly's Food Channel has written an article about their experiment: "Good Food: Who Can Afford It?"

100_5158.JPG
Read the rest of this post... |

Read the comments on this post...

Also check out the featured ScienceBlog of the week: Neurotopia

See original: ScienceBlogs Select Questioning Sustainable Eating [The World's Fair]

Giant Green Spiral Over the North Pole [Dynamics of Cats]

Quick!
Its the Santa Signal!
Get the Sled, and Rudolph, fast!

Or, a spontaneous study of how many people have cell phones with video capability and fast reflexes!

Read the rest of this post... |

Read the comments on this post...

Also check out the featured ScienceBlog of the week: Neurotopia

See original: ScienceBlogs Select Giant Green Spiral Over the North Pole [Dynamics of Cats]

RT @JasonFalls: Idea: Social profiles tied to cell numbers allow customer service centers to ID and serve up your favorite music while h ...

sandygautam: RT @JasonFalls: Idea: Social profiles tied to cell numbers allow customer service centers to ID and serve up your favorite music while h ...

See original: Twitter RT @JasonFalls: Idea: Social profiles tied to cell numbers allow customer service centers to ID and serve up your favorite music while h ...