Friday Weird Science: The Stuttering Priapism

Who would have thought Sci would be running a normal pub-med search, for something COMPLETELY not weird science material, and come across...this? Truly, it was meant to be!

This case report is probably one of the weirdest things I've seen all week, and kept Sci scratching her head as to the possible mechanism. Also, it is, without a doubt, one of the most incredibly embarrassing thing to ever happen to a 15-year-old. And you thought YOUR teenage stories were bad...

Scwartz and Rushton. "Stuttering priapism associated with withdrawal from sustained-release methylphenidate" Journal of Pediatrics, 2004. Read the rest of this post... | Read the comments on this post......

Schwartz, R., & Rushton, H. (2004) Stuttering priapism associated with withdrawal from sustained-release methylphenidate. The Journal of Pediatrics, 144(5), 675-676. DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2003.12.039  Stuttering priapism associated with withdrawal from sustained-release methylphenidate


See original: Research Blogging - All Topics - English Friday Weird Science: The Stuttering Priapism

How fun can change people's decisions - The Piano Stairway http://ff.im/b360Q

EvoMRI: How fun can change people's decisions - The Piano Stairway http://ff.im/b360Q

See original: Twitter How fun can change people's decisions - The Piano Stairway http://ff.im/b360Q

Horse genome unlocked by science

The genome of a domestic horse has been successfully sequenced by an international team of researchers.

See original: Earth | Earth News Horse genome unlocked by science

Liked "The Piano Stairway (video)" http://ff.im/aKifw

EvoMRI: Liked "The Piano Stairway (video)" http://ff.im/aKifw

See original: Twitter Liked "The Piano Stairway (video)" http://ff.im/aKifw

Remember, Remember the Fifth of November [The Primate Diaries]


Remember, remember the fifth of November,
The gunpowder treason and plot,
I know of no reason
Why the gunpowder treason
Should ever be forgot.

On this day, in 1604, Guy Fawkes was arrested in his attempt to overthrow the English monarchy by blowing up the House of Lords and assassinate King James I (who would have been present at the time). Since his arrest Fawkes' crime has been condemned as terrorism motivated by fanatical Catholic outrage against the Protestant regime of James I. However, is the religious angle enough to explain his actions and those of his conspirators? What was at the root of his discontent and is there anything we can learn today from this event, more than four hundred years ago?

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See original: ScienceBlogs Select Remember, Remember the Fifth of November [The Primate Diaries]

Antivirals and resistance: Adamantanes

In the case of a pandemic, and during the seasonal epidemics, once a person has already contracted the influenza, we can do little, other than monitor and treat him with antivirals. However, they are not always a guarantee of success, especially in the case of resistant viruses.

Amantadine and rimantadine are the first drugs used against [...]...

Davies, W., Grunert, R., Haff, R., McGahen, J., Neumayer, E., Paulshock, M., Watts, J., Wood, T., Hermann, E., & Hoffmann, C. (1964) Antiviral Activity of 1-Adamantanamine (Amantadine). Science, 144(3620), 862-863. DOI: 10.1126/science.144.3620.862  Antiviral Activity of 1-Adamantanamine (Amantadine)

Pielak, R., Schnell, J., & Chou, J. (2009) Mechanism of drug inhibition and drug resistance of influenza A M2 channel. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 106(18), 7379-7384. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0902548106  Mechanism of drug inhibition and drug resistance of influenza A M2 channel

Weinstock, D. (2006) Adamantane Resistance in Influenza A. JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association. DOI: 10.1001/jama.295.8.jed60009  Adamantane Resistance in Influenza A

, . (2009) Emergence of a Novel Swine-Origin Influenza A (H1N1) Virus in Humans. New England Journal of Medicine, 360(25), 2605-2615. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa0903810  Emergence of a Novel Swine-Origin Influenza A (H1N1) Virus in Humans


See original: Research Blogging - All Topics - English Antivirals and resistance: Adamantanes

Antivirales y resistencia: Adamantanas

En el caso de una pandemia, y durante las epidemias sazonales, cuando la persona ya contrajo el virus influenza, es poco lo que podemos hacer además de monitorizarla y tratarla con antivirales. Pero ni siempre ellos ofrecen garantía  de éxito, principalmente en el caso de virus resistentes.

Amantadina y rimantadina, son las primeras drogas utilizadas contra [...]...

Davies, W., Grunert, R., Haff, R., McGahen, J., Neumayer, E., Paulshock, M., Watts, J., Wood, T., Hermann, E., & Hoffmann, C. (1964) Antiviral Activity of 1-Adamantanamine (Amantadine). Science, 144(3620), 862-863. DOI: 10.1126/science.144.3620.862  Antiviral Activity of 1-Adamantanamine (Amantadine)

Pielak, R., Schnell, J., & Chou, J. (2009) Mechanism of drug inhibition and drug resistance of influenza A M2 channel. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 106(18), 7379-7384. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0902548106  Mechanism of drug inhibition and drug resistance of influenza A M2 channel

, . (2009) Emergence of a Novel Swine-Origin Influenza A (H1N1) Virus in Humans. New England Journal of Medicine, 360(25), 2605-2615. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa0903810  Emergence of a Novel Swine-Origin Influenza A (H1N1) Virus in Humans


See original: Research Blogging - All Topics - Spanish Antivirales y resistencia: Adamantanas

It’s Not Just Carbon

Most of the discussion of climate change and options for mitigating it has focused on carbon dioxide emissions and the potential for reducing them.  This is reasonable enough, since carbon dioxide is by far the most abundant greenhouse gas, and it’s fiendishly difficult to do anything about once it’s emitted.  It stays in the atmosphere [...]...

VANVUUREN, D., WEYANT, J., & DELACHESNAYE, F. (2006) Multi-gas scenarios to stabilize radiative forcing. Energy Economics, 28(1), 102-120. DOI: 10.1016/j.eneco.2005.10.003  Multi-gas scenarios to stabilize radiative forcing


See original: Research Blogging - All Topics - English It’s Not Just Carbon

What's the best way to take a study break? [Cognitive Daily]

ResearchBlogging.orgGreta and I did our undergraduate studies at the University of Chicago, or as a commonly-sold T-shirt on campus put it, "where fun goes to die." To say that Chicago didn't emphasize academics over a social life is to deny that people literally lived in the library (a full-scale campsite was found behind one of the stairwells in the stacks; students had been living there for months). It's not that the administration didn't try to encourage its students to socialize. The library did close at 10 p.m. on Friday nights. There was not one but two film societies, so often students had to choose between, say, the Hitchcock fest at one theater and the Kurosawa marathon at the other.

Still, studying was the primary focus of campus life. There may have been five fraternities, but there were 30 coffee shops on campus. We didn't have "parties," we had "study breaks." But one thing we never managed to do while we were there was figure out what the most effective study break might be. When you're studying during nearly every free moment, what's the best way to clear up your mind and refocus yourself for the next round of studying?

One old idea that has re-emerged recently is called "attention restoration theory", or ART. William James actually discussed a similar concept in his 1892 psychology textbook. The idea that taking a walk in the woods can help you refocus your thoughts is at least as old as Immanuel Kant, and probably older. But how exactly does interacting with nature help focus attention? ART says that the natural world engages your attention in a bottom-up fashion, by features of the environment (e.g. a sunset, a beautiful tree). The artificial world demands active attention, to avoid getting hit by cars or to follow street signs. Since intellectual activities like studying or writing also demand the same kind of attention, taking a break in the artificial world doesn't really function like a rest.

Marc Berman, John Jonides, and Stephen Kaplan wanted to see if they could measure the effect of ART. They paid 38 student volunteers to do a backwards digit-span task. The volunteers were given sequences of 3 to 9 numeric digits and had to repeat them in reverse, so if the experimenter said "6-1-9" then the student would say "9-1-6". After 14 tests (two of each length), the students took an hour-long walk either through an arboretum, or through downtown Ann Arbor. Then the digit-span test was repeated. Did a walk through nature improve the digit-span score? Here are the results:

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See original: ScienceBlogs Select What's the best way to take a study break? [Cognitive Daily]

Reflections on Science 2.0 from a distance - Part I

Some months ago now I gave a talk at very exciting symposium organized by Greg Wilson as a closer for the Software Carpentry course he was running at Toronto University. It was exciting because of the lineup but also because it represented a real coming together of views on how developments in computer science and infrastructure as well as new social [...]

See original: Science in the open Reflections on Science 2.0 from a distance - Part I