Capturing process – Challenges and opportunities

A presentation given at Newcastle University discussing the challenges of capturing research process and how experimental science might be wired into the linked data web.

See original: Science in the Open Capturing process – Challenges and opportunities

First biology on SANS2d – Will accelerator source time-of-flight SANS deliver for structural biology

Neutrons in Biology – Santa Fe – 24-29 October 2009
First Biology on SANS2d
View more presentations from Cameron Neylon.

See original: Science in the Open First biology on SANS2d – Will accelerator source time-of-flight SANS deliver for structural biology

Crowdsourcing expertise

Can ordinary citizens help policymakers solve the most pressing problems of our time? That's what elections are supposed to be for - but when they fail, it might be worth trying something like ExpertLabs, a new effort launched today to tap into collective public expertise to better inform policymaking.

ExpertLabs is a new initiative of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and headed up by blogger Anil Dash. Other high-level names have joined up: $500,000 in seed funding comes from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) has signed up to the concept.

It's surely a worthwhile experiment, but the question is what will actually result from it. Other efforts to increase webbiness and transparency in the Obama administration have suffered glitches, from a White House press site that took a while to get its press releases up on time to an OSTP blog that promised dialogue but ended up with the usual handful of rambling public comments rather than any sort of interactive and stimulating conversation.

Stay tuned to see if ExpertLabs delivers on its arm-waving promises of today.

Related posts:

  1. Czars are cropping up all over Partisan bickering in Washington has so many bigger things to...
  2. US stimulus boosters rally in their echo chamber Boosters of US research are trumpeting what they call the...
  3. Crowdsourcing for Plants Hungry people may be more sophisticated sensors than any...

See original: Science News Crowdsourcing expertise

2009 November 18

2009 November 18



Water Discovered in Moon Shadow Credit: LCROSS,

Why is there water on the Moon?

Last month, the
LCROSS mission crashed a large
impactor into a
permanently shadowed crater near the
Moon's South Pole.

A plume of dust rose that was visible to
the satellite,
although hard to discern from Earth.

The plume is shown above in visible light.

Last week, the results of a preliminary chemical analysis gave a clear indication that the
dust plume contained water.

Such water is of importance not only for understanding the
history of the Moon,
but as a possible reservoir for future astronauts trying to
live on the Moon for long periods.

The source of the
lunar water
is now a topic of debate.

Possible origins include many small meteorites,
a comet, or primordial
moon soil

dark tomorrow

See original: Astronomy Picture of the Day
 - Page2RSS 2009 November 18

Liked "Predatory Coral Eats Jellyfish" http://ff.im/bBeJu

EvoMRI: Liked "Predatory Coral Eats Jellyfish" http://ff.im/bBeJu

See original: Twitter Liked "Predatory Coral Eats Jellyfish" http://ff.im/bBeJu

Plants Have a Social Life Too

After decades of seeing plants as passive recipients of fate, scientists have found them capable of behaviors once thought unique to animals. Some plants even appear to be social, favoring family while pushing strangers from the neighborhood.
Research into plant sociality is still young, with many questions unanswered. But it may change how people conceive of [...]

Related posts:

  1. Plants Know Their Relatives — And Like Them! Unlike many human brothers and sisters, plant siblings appear...
  2. In the Bowels of Carnivorous Plants, a Model of the World For insight into fabulously complex ecological dynamics, Harvard University...
  3. In the Bowels of Carnivorous Plants, a Tiny Model of the World For insight into fabulously complex ecological dynamics, Harvard University...

See original: Science News Plants Have a Social Life Too

... and then what? : The Book of Trogool http://ff.im/bF6jd

mrgunn: ... and then what? : The Book of Trogool http://ff.im/bF6jd

See original: Twitter ... and then what? : The Book of Trogool http://ff.im/bF6jd

Expert Labs is officially launched

We've just officially launched at the Web 2.0 Expo, and will have video of our launch announcement shortly. In the meantime, check out our announcement on the AAAS website: Dash said that the new initiative's name reflects its goal of bringing three distinct communities of experts together: “We're going to tap into the expertise of the policy community to identify what questions need to be answered,” he explained. “We're going to tap into the technology community to collaboratively build platforms that help get those questions answered, and finally, we'll tap into the science and technology communities to provide the answers...

See original: Expert Labs Expert Labs is officially launched

Expert Labs is officially launched

We've just officially launched at the Web 2.0 Expo, and will have video of our launch announcement shortly. In the meantime, check out our announcement on the AAAS website: Dash said that the new initiative's name reflects its goal of bringing three distinct communities of experts together: “We're going to tap into the expertise of the policy community to identify what questions need to be answered,” he explained. “We're going to tap into the technology community to collaboratively build platforms that help get those questions answered, and finally, we'll tap into the science and technology communities to provide the answers...

See original: Expert Labs Expert Labs is officially launched

El impacto de la crianza cooperativa de los niños en la evolución de la cognición humana

Según la hipótesis de la crianza cooperativa, la emergencia del cuidado alomaternal (cuando las madres permiten que sus hijos sean criados y educados por otros miembros del grupo) y de la ayuda comunitaria explicarían los rasgos más específicos del género Homo en los últimos 2 millones de años.La evolución de la intencionalidad compartida (la habilidad y la disposición para colaborar con otros que comparten objetivos e intenciones) habría desempeñado un papel crucial. La diferencia con los grandes simios radicaría en que, pese a que estos poseen una rudimentaria teoría de la mente e incluso cierto sentido de la "injusticia", es más corriente que empleen estas habilidades cognitivas en contextos competitivos.La presencia de cuidado maternal exclusivo, en particular, es un fuerte predictor negativo de pro-socialidad, tal como indican los trabajos con chimpancés o macacos (especies "exclusivistas"). Los experimentos, en cambio, muestras indicios más fuertes de conductas prosociales en especies no exlclusivistas: monos capuchinos, monos tití, elefantes e incluso cánidos.La crianza cooperativa, y el impulso de ayuda en las especies de homínidos sociales, estaría fuertemente relacionado con el desarrollo de la cultura y del lenguaje. Hay un largo camino desde las comidas compartidas por los cazadores-recolectores hasta Twitter: "Cuando la prosocialidad espontánea se extiende de la donación de comida a la información, entramos en el reino del aprendizaje". Burkart et al. consideran que su hipótesis proporciona la base biológica del "principio de cooperación" que los lingüistas han dado históricamente por supuesto. J. M. Burkart, S. B. Hrdy, & C. P. Van Schaik (2009). Cooperative breeding and human cognitive evolution Evolutionary anthropology : 10.1002/evan.20222...

J. M. Burkart, S. B. Hrdy, & C. P. Van Schaik. (2009) Cooperative breeding and human cognitive evolution. Evolutionary anthropology. info:/10.1002/evan.20222


See original: Research Blogging - All Topics - Spanish El impacto de la crianza cooperativa de los niños en la evolución de la cognición humana