"Who's missing? Link!" http://ff.im/bEte7

EvoMRI: "Who's missing? Link!" http://ff.im/bEte7

See original: Twitter "Who's missing? Link!" http://ff.im/bEte7

Ray has a change in plans

Apparently, because people had plans to counter some of Ray Comfort's Origin giveaway — which was announced to occur on the 19th — Comfort is giving them away today. I've been getting reports from various universities that his minions are at work right now, as in this photo from Oxford.

Get out and grab yours now!

I'm going to stroll over to the UMM campus, although I'll be very surprised if any were sent to our very small school.

Read the comments on this post...

Related posts:

  1. What to do about Ray Comfort’s Origin give-away Go to the NCSE's Don't Diss Darwin site, and download...
  2. The Pastor Ray Mummert award goes to… …Houston Friend, a student at ASU who got a bad...
  3. A very unusual present When I picked up my mail this afternoon, I was...

See original: Science News Ray has a change in plans

@XiXiDu ..but ya, still have to read their paper though...

sandygautam: @XiXiDu ..but ya, still have to read their paper though...

See original: Twitter @XiXiDu ..but ya, still have to read their paper though...

@XiXiDu ..by that I mean the fundamental units become as unrelaible and cheap to run as a neuron..dont remember where I read this recently.

sandygautam: @XiXiDu ..by that I mean the fundamental units become as unrelaible and cheap to run as a neuron..dont remember where I read this recently.

See original: Twitter @XiXiDu ..by that I mean the fundamental units become as unrelaible and cheap to run as a neuron..dont remember where I read this recently.

@XiXiDu simulations are good and especially having a new algo helps, but more foucus should be on bringing underlying h/w close to brain

sandygautam: @XiXiDu simulations are good and especially having a new algo helps, but more foucus should be on bringing underlying h/w close to brain

See original: Twitter @XiXiDu simulations are good and especially having a new algo helps, but more foucus should be on bringing underlying h/w close to brain

Media Attention May Indirectly Fuel Drug Abuse

John Brownstein (Harvard Medical School and Children's Hospital Boston) and coworkers have documented that deaths by opioid abuse in the United States peak between two and six months after peaks in media reports on opioid abuse. This news feature was written on November 18, 2009....

Dasgupta, N., Mandl, K. D., & Brownstein, J. S. (2009) Breaking the News or Fueling the Epidemic? Temporal Association between News Media Report Volume and Opioid-Related Mortality. PLoS ONE, 4(11). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0007758  Breaking the News or Fueling the Epidemic? Temporal Association between News Media Report Volume and Opioid-Related Mortality


See original: Research Blogging - All Topics - English Media Attention May Indirectly Fuel Drug Abuse

Does Afghanistan Need One Laptop Per Child?

Some friends of mine from college asked the following question about OLPC Afghanistan:

Empowering girls' education

Greg Mortensen built 200 schools in Pakistan and Afghanistan for less than the cost of one cruise missile. In doing so, he has done vastly more to end Islamic fundamentalism than the entire US effort in Iraq and Afghanistan. Is it enough, C.?

No, it isn't enough. Afghanistan needs its own army and police built up, plus a civil service and infrastructure: roads, schools, clinics, electricity, phones, Internet, microfinance. But if you do all of that, and don't build and supply schools, it all falls apart. The Taliban demonstrate this fact themselves by destroying every school they can get to, other than their own boys-only madrassas, and
shooting teachers.

See original: One Laptop Per Child News Does Afghanistan Need One Laptop Per Child?

@XiXiDu no link...:-(

sandygautam: @XiXiDu no link...:-(

See original: Twitter @XiXiDu no link...:-(

..contd. a misleading headline from Sci am actually. TOM does not mean mind-reading. just that others have thoughts that can be different..

sandygautam: ..contd. a misleading headline from Sci am actually. TOM does not mean mind-reading. just that others have thoughts that can be different..

See original: Twitter ..contd. a misleading headline from Sci am actually. TOM does not mean mind-reading. just that others have thoughts that can be different..

Oh no! Ideophones are not response cries!

In their commentary on Evans & Levinson's recent hotly debated Myth of Language Universals paper, Pinker & Jackendoff briefly mention ideophones — and erroneously shelve them away as 'response cries'. It seems this error is a particularly easy one to make for speakers of SAE languages. In this post I flesh out why this might be so, and explain what's the difference between response cries (also known as interjections) and ideophones....

Pinker, S., & Jackendoff, R. (2009) The reality of a universal language faculty. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 32(05), 465. DOI: 10.1017/S0140525X09990720  The reality of a universal language faculty


See original: Research Blogging - All Topics - English Oh no! Ideophones are not response cries!

How infants affect how much their carers engage with them

Young children benefit socially and intellectually the more their carers engage and respond to them. Recognising this, we can train nursery staff to be as responsive to the children in their care as possible. But a new study by Claire Vallotton raises an interesting and under-examined issue - what if there's something about some infants that leads their carers to engage with them more, thus giving them an advantage over their peers?

Vallotton filmed interactions between 18 student caregivers and 10 infants (aged between 4 and 19 months) at the Infant and Toddler programme at the UC Davis child development lab. Carers working here were taught "baby signing" - this is a gesture-based system for pre-verbal infants and adults to communicate with each other. For example, pointing the hands inwards, towards the mid-line, with fingers touching, is the sign for "more".

The student carers interacted with their designated child one-on-one, and importantly for this research, they occasionally switched which child was under their care, thus allowing Vallotton to see if some children consistently provoked more engagement from different carers.

There were some general effects: boys and older children provoked more attentiveness from their carers. But Vallotton's more novel finding was that infants who responded more to their carers' signs, either with signs of their own or with conventional gestures such as pointing or waving, tended to provoke more engagement and responsiveness from their carers.

This carer responsiveness was measured with a scale containing items such as "follows child's gaze" and "is at the child's physical level". Crucially, it was not an infant's total amount, or variety, of signing or gesturing that was related to more carer attentiveness. It was specifically an infant's amount of gestural response to the carer's own attempts at communication. In other words, the carers engaged a lot more with babies and toddlers who responded to them. This may sound obvious but it suggests the carers were biased, probably subconsciously. They were effectively making more effort with the infants who interacted with them more.

Obviously a major factor limiting the generalisability of this research is the use of baby-signing in this care group. However, Vallotton thinks her findings probably do apply more generally. "Caregivers [were] more responsive to infants who use more gestures, regardless of whether those gestures were conventional pointing or infant signs," she said. And the take-home message, she concluded, is that "infants' communicative behaviours affect caregiver responsiveness ... Increasing infants' use of gestures and signs may be a means to enhance responsiveness in caregiver-child interaction, a possibility that should be tested experimentally."
_________________________________

ResearchBlogging.orgVallotton, C. (2009). Do infants influence their quality of care? Infants’ communicative gestures predict caregivers’ responsiveness Infant Behavior and Development, 32 (4), 351-365 DOI: 10.1016/j.infbeh.2009.06.001

Bookmark and Share

See original: BPS Research Digest How infants affect how much their carers engage with them