Des catastrophes … « naturelles » ?

L'idée majeure qui ressort de ce livre est que ce sont les sociétés humaines qui fabriquent les catastrophes « naturelles ». La catastrophe est "naturelle" parce qu’elle est déclenchée par des aléas qui n’ont pas été créés directement par l’homme, mais elle se nourrit des déséquilibres liés à des processus de « mal-développement ». Ces événements sont d'excellents révélateurs de la vulnérabilité des sociétés humaines. L'objectif des auteurs est de faire comprendre comment les systèmes du risque se construisent puis donnent naissance à une catastrophe naturelle. Lorsqu’un aléa naturel se produit, l’ampleur des impacts dépend autant de la vulnérabilité de la société que de l’aléa lui-même. Il faut donc considérer le système du risque qui répond à un aléa par une « chaîne d’impacts ».

L'analyse est basée sur 7 études de cas en milieu littoral ou insulaire. Elle « met en débat nombre d’idées reçues qui tendent à caricaturer la réalité », comme celle qui veut que les pays développés soien...

See original: VertigO - la revue électronique en sciences de l'environnement Des catastrophes … « naturelles » ?

La renaissance des communs

Nous saluons l’effort d’Hervé Le Crosnier et de Matthieu Calame d’avoir suggéré la production de cet ouvrage et sa traduction en français. C’est qu’en effet, si la question des « communs », ces biens utilisés et partagés par une communauté, est une question économique déjà ancienne puisqu’elle est inhérente au libéralisme, la question de l’accès aux ressources – matérielle et immatérielles - communes prend un nouveau tour avec la crise écologique mondiale. Rappelant l’acharnement avec lequel, depuis la publication de la fameuse « Tragédie des communs », essai de Hardin publié en 1968 et inspiré d’un texte de… 1832, l’économie libérale s’évertue à prouver les vertus d’une privatisation et d’une marchandisation de tout ce qui peut l’être, la nation de commun mérite d’être élargie, par delà la nature, à un ensemble de pratiques sociales qui peuvent être considéré dorénavant comme des ressources pour des sociétés résilientes. Elargissant la question de « l’enclosure des communs » (priva...

See original: VertigO - la revue électronique en sciences de l'environnement La renaissance des communs

International Journal of Environment (IJE) ISSN 2091-2854

Dear all,
Greetings from PSD-Nepal!
It is my great pleasure to write this mail to you.
International Journal of Environment (IJE) published by Progressive Sustainable Developers Nepal (PSD-Nepal) has already published three (3) volumes and the next issue is on the way. Author(s) from 18 different countries including Nepal could successfully publish their research works in the past volumes.
Please see the IJE archive for the details of each papers and author(s)
http://www.nepjol.info/index.php/IJE/issue/archive
Within a very short period of time, IJE could make an academic relationship (author, reviewer, member and advisor) with experts from about 45 different countries.
http://www.nepjol.info/index.php/IJE/about/editorialPolicies#custom-0
IJE is indexed in Ulrich, Research Bible, J-Gate, Journal TOCs and HINARI.
You can view the full papers of current issue through this link
http://www.nepjol.info/index.php/IJE/issue/current

Famine and food

The ongoing debate regarding the efficacy of genetically modified (GM) crops to increase global food security goes on, while a recent study of US consumers indicates that opinions on genetically modifies crops are not swayed by specific arguments about plant disease and famine.

At least one million people died and a further one million were forced to emigrate during the Irish potato famine of 1845-1852. Those figures are so often repeated in undergraduate plant pathology classrooms that they lose their shock value. Those years seem so distantly removed from our lives in the 21st century that we occasionally fail to recall that it happened just a handful of generations ago. The famine had such a profound impact on the social, geographic and economic landscape of Ireland that the country still bears the scars. For instance, the population of the Republic of Ireland, as measured by the 2011 census, stands at 4.6 million compared to a pre-famine population of 6.5 million in 1841. Meanwhile, there are 39.6 million Americans who claim Irish ancestry, due in part to massive emigration to the US during and immediately after the famine.

In a recently published study, American consumers were asked their opinion of GM. Half of the sample group were first asked to read a short vignette describing the causal agent of the potato famine, the fungal-like potato disease late blight. The second half of the sample was asked to read a similar vignette, though not mentioning late blight and the Irish famine specifically.

For example, the late blight-specific vignette included:
"Late blight was a key cause of the Irish Potato Famine of the 1850s that led to the starvation of millions of people in Ireland and forced many Irish to leave the country. Late blight has re-emerged in recent years as a substantial threat to crops across the United States and around the world."

Ultimately, even when the question was contextualised in relation to late blight and famine, there was no significant difference in public views about the perceived risks, benefits or fairness of GM crops. This is an interesting finding; given calls in Europe and elsewhere to increase the cultivation of GM crops, particularly in traditionally GM-sceptical nations such as the UK.
This year, for example, the Council for Science and Technology in the UK, scientific advisors to the government, called for the EU to end its “dysfunctional” regulations on GM crop cultivation saying that if the country didn’t embrace GM “the risk is people going unfed”.

Even in Ireland, where one might expect the memory of the famine to linger long with consumers, limited trials of late blight resistant potato plants in recent years have met with some resistance. These EU-funded trials, conducted by Ireland’s agricultural development agency were described as “economic suicide” by opponents who called GM an “unwanted technology”. The scientists conducting the trials, which began in 2012, were keen to stress the impartial nature of the study and that it was not about “testing the commercial viability of GM potatoes” and was specifically concerned with their environmental impact.

In fact, there is a myriad of reasons why some consumers reject GM technologies in foodstuffs. Not all of them, of course, are supported by any real science, but that doesn’t negate the fact that they are real obstacles to overcome for those who would promote a sustainable food-production system which incorporates all aspects of biotechnology, including genetic modification of crop plants. What is clear now is that simply using the approach of emphasising the crop protection benefits of GM is not enough. Consumers are, rightly or wrongly, also worried about the environmental impact of such crops and no amount of appealing to their memory of past catastrophic crop failures will appease them.

One might argue that the passing of time between the Irish potato famine and the current advances in plant biotechnology can account for the lack of relevance and impact on consumer opinion. Perhaps, informing consumers about more recent plant disease outbreaks would be more beneficial.  One could point to the Bengal famine of 1943, when an estimated 2 million people died when the rice crop was attacked by a fungal pathogen. In truth, the vast bulk of food for human consumption worldwide is provided by just fourteen crop plants. Failure of any one of these could have a significant impact on global food security. However, we are in a very dark place indeed if we must look for a catastrophic crop failure to remind consumers of the value of plant biotechnology in protecting our food supply.

See original: Communicate Science Famine and food

The collegiality of twitter

Delivering a workshop at Aquatnet (Image: @jbaqua)

Last week, I spent a great two days taking part in the AQUATNET Digital Teaching Skills Workshop, as well as helping to deliver the social media element of the workshop. As the two days came to a close in sunny Malta, it seemed appropriate to draw together some concluding thoughts on the issue of social networking in education.
The workshop kicked off with a very informative talk delivered by Mike Moulton of the Norwegian University of Life Sciences. Mike discussed the realities of teaching and learning in the "age of tweets", emphasising the growing importance of twitter amongst educationalists. Twitter and other social media tools, Moulton encouraged, were means of "creating trustworthy pathways through the internet".
In this respect, I was reminded of occasional responses I have received from non-tweeting academics to my use of twitter. "I don't know how you find the time to do all the tweeting", they might say or "shouldn't you be doing some proper work?".
My response to that is often: "How do you find the time not to tweet?". Social media allows you to establish a trustworthy network of contacts who are willing and able to do some of the leg-work for you. For example, my twitter network is able to

  • highlight the newest research in my area
  • share the latest news in my discipline
  • inform me of funding opportunities, job opportunities, etc.
  • allow for interaction and collaboration with others
  • inform me of upcoming conferences, workshops, etc.

As well as this, I form part of many other peoples' network where I hopefully perform many of the same roles for my followers. At its best, twitter and other forms of social media are about sharing and collegiality. For this to work, it's really essential that you are following the right people: those who share generously, inform, enlighten, challenge and debate. A well-curated twitter network has the capacity to reach much further than you can. Instead of you, as an individual, trying to keep an eye on emerging trends in a discipline, your twitter community can do so and share that information with you. An efficient use of your time, if ever I saw one.

I'm not alone in holding those views. Recently, I posed a question to my own twitter followers:

Student or teacher, can you sum up why twitter & social media are useful TO YOU for teaching & learning in one tweet?? #scisocialmedia RT?
— Eoin Lettice (@blogscience) June 16, 2014

And got some interesting results, including:

@blogscience I like that it is short, sharp and encourages factual statement or further exploration (e.g. linking out) #scisocialmedia
— bren (@brenstrong) June 16, 2014

@blogscience gives access to thought leaders you may not traditionally be able to access
— Ali Sheridan (@SherSustainable) June 17, 2014

@blogscience Hundreds of opinions and ideas, plus a great way of seeing things you otherwise wouldn't have a chance to. #priceless
— Paul Smyth (@paultsmyth) June 17, 2014

@blogscience Mostly use Twitter for research, and by following a few top scientists in a field you get info. before it reaches journals etc.
— Martin Hodson (@MartinHodson1) June 17, 2014

@blogscience #SciSocialMedia allows me to continue to learn during my 'leisure time' + is a great tool to spark ideas + foster collaboration
— NoSiree (@cairotango) June 16, 2014

@blogscience #socmedia is Tch/learn: infinite txtbook, tchr guide, staffr:-)m, class message board, curated resources, library access point
— Al Smith (@literateowl) June 16, 2014

One use of microblogging in education that I tried to highlight in the recent workshop was the idea of 'live-tweeting' the lecture. Corey Ryan Earle has written a really useful blog post on this idea based on his experience teaching a history course to nearly 400 students at Cornell University. Earle found that encouraging the students to tweet during the lecture encouraged active engagement, reduced distractions and provided instant feedback to the lecturer. Live-tweeting is something I'll be introducing in my first-year biology lectures this year. With over 400 students enrolled, it will be interesting to see whether it boosts interaction with the course material. I'll let you know how it goes!

See original: Communicate Science The collegiality of twitter

n/a

n/a

n/a

[VertigO] élargit son réseau en accueillant deux nouveaux partenaires

L’équipe de [VertigO] est heureuse de joindre l’Institut d’urbanisme et d’aménagement régional (IUAR) de l’Université de Strasbourg et l’Institut Francilien des sciences appliquées (IFSA) de l’Université Paris-Est Marne-la-Vallée à son réseau de partenaires. Ses deux partenaires français viennent, grâce à l’expertise de leurs membres et leurs dynamismes, consolider un domaine de recherche, de formation et d’intervention en pleine effervescence en sciences de l’environnement, l’urbain. Avec plus de 50% de la population mondiale se trouvant en ville et une urbanisation croissante, particulièrement dans les pays en développement, ses deux partenaires aideront la revue à mieux se positionner et mieux appréhender cet enjeu dans les dossiers à venir. Le réseau des partenaires de [VertigO] compte maintenant un partenaire sud-américain, un partenaire belge,  4 partenaires africains, 7 partenaires canadiens et 11 partenaires français. Ceux-ci participent au dynamisme de la revue et par leur implication soutiennent la diffusion en accès libre des connaissances en sciences de l’environnement et le développement d’un réseau de chercheurs francophones dans le domaine. Afin de permettre un meilleur arrimage dans le cadre du partenariat et de développer une synergie scientifique, deux membres de ses instituts siégeront au comité scientifique de la revue. Ainsi, Maurice Wintz (IUAR) et Bruno Barroca (IFSA) amèneront, […]

See original: Sciences de l'environnement : vous dites ! [VertigO] élargit son réseau en accueillant deux nouveaux partenaires

[VertigO] : Appel à soumission de textes pour un nouveau dossier : « Temporalités, action environnementale et mobilisations sociales »

L’objectif de ce dossier de [VertigO] est recueillir des textes qui permettent de penser de façon compréhensive l’impact des marqueurs temporels dans les dynamiques d’action environnementales dans leur mode de penser et d’agir, de conception et d’action. Dans le cadre de ce dossier, le comité formé par les rédacteurs associés est à la recherche de textes qui questionnent l’empreinte du temps dans l’action publique environnementale, en considérant celle-ci non seulement par le prisme des politiques publiques, mais aussi des synergies/empêchements de penser et d’agir face aux problématiques d’environnement.   Les questions relevant de l’environnement sont marquées par l’urgence, l’impératif de ce qui doit être fait avant que l’irrémédiable ne se produise, et ce, depuis plus d’un siècle (Marsh, 1864 ; Carson, 1962 ; Club de Rome, 1972). Si le rapport issu de la Commission Brundtland institutionnalisant l’ère d’un « développement durable » a introduit par ailleurs la dialectique temporelle dans nos modes d’action, sinon de pensée, a-t-on vraiment pris la mesure de ces temporalités ? Et, dans la mesure où cette temporalité aurait été intégrée – ce qui ne va pas de soi nécessairement –, comment cela se serait-il exprimé (voire, comment cela se serait transposé) à travers l’action environnementale, […]

See original: Sciences de l'environnement : vous dites ! [VertigO] : Appel à soumission de textes pour un nouveau dossier : « Temporalités, action environnementale et mobilisations sociales »

Temporalités, action environnementale et mobilisations sociales

Coordination du numéro : Nathalie Lewis (Département Sociétés, territoires et développement, Université du Québec à Rimouski, Canada), Didier Busca (CERTOP, Université Toulouse – Le Mirail, France), Louis Simard (École d'études politiques, Université d'Ottawa, Canada), Bruno Villalba (Ceraps, Sciences Po, Lille, France).

Les questions relevant de l’environnement sont marquées par l’urgence, l’impératif de ce qui doit être fait avant que l’irrémédiable ne se produise, et ce, depuis plus d’un siècle (Marsh, 1864 ; Carson, 1962 ; Club de Rome, 1972). Si le rapport issu de la Commission Brundtland institutionnalisant l’ère d’un « développement durable » a introduit par ailleurs la dialectique temporelle dans nos modes d’action, sinon de pensée, a-t-on vraiment pris la mesure de ces temporalités ? Et, dans la mesure où cette temporalité aurait été intégrée – ce qui ne va pas de soi nécessairement –, comment cela se serait-il exprimé (voire, comment cela se serait transposé) à travers l’ac...

See original: VertigO - la revue électronique en sciences de l'environnement Temporalités, action environnementale et mobilisations sociales

Les politiques agricoles de l'Indonésie et de la Malaisie face aux impératifs de la sécurité alimentaire

Depuis les années 1960, plusieurs pays d’Asie du Sud-Est ont réussi à atteindre, surtout grâce à l’augmentation de la production agricole, une plus grande sécurité alimentaire. L’État postcolonial a été au cœur de l’essor de l’agriculture en Indonésie et en Malaisie, mais son rôle tend à se modifier surtout depuis le tournant du millénaire. Pour cerner les transformations des politiques agricoles contemporaines en Indonésie et en Malaisie, nous abordons la question suivante : quelles sont les stratégies adoptées par les États pour assurer la sécurité alimentaire? Afin d’y répondre, les politiques concernant deux filières agricoles de premier plan, soit celles du riz et de l’huile de palme, sont passées en revue. L’étude démontre que les deux États ont d’abord poursuivi des politiques d’autosuffisance en matière de production rizicole avec des résultats variables. Malgré des mesures de libéralisation depuis la fin des années 1990, plusieurs mécanismes assurent toujours l’encadrement ...

See original: VertigO - la revue électronique en sciences de l'environnement Les politiques agricoles de l'Indonésie et de la Malaisie face aux impératifs de la sécurité alimentaire

Marchés institutionnels et soutien à l’agriculture familiale au Brésil : étude de cas de producteurs insérés dans le programme d’alimentation scolaire

Au Brésil, les récentes avancées du Programme national d’alimentation scolaire (PNAE), qui articule soutien à l’agriculture familiale et sécurité alimentaire des populations précaires, vont dans le sens d’une relocalisation des circuits alimentaires. L’objectif de ce travail est de comprendre comment l’insertion d’un collectif de producteurs dans différentes formes de circuits courts, et notamment via ces politiques publiques de restauration collective, a permis de consolider un système agricole innovant, tant au point de vue productif, qu’en termes d’occupation du sol périurbain, d’entretien du paysage et des ressources naturelles, d’organisation du travail et de valorisation sociale de l’activité agricole, en mobilisant notamment la multifonctionnalité de l’agriculture comme outil d’analyse.

See original: VertigO - la revue électronique en sciences de l'environnement Marchés institutionnels et soutien à l’agriculture familiale au Brésil : étude de cas de producteurs insérés dans le programme d’alimentation scolaire

Le terroir, un concept pour l’action dans le développement des territoires

Entre les usages professionnels et sociaux du mot terroir et les significations correspondantes, une grande diversité de représentations mentales du mot engendre une difficulté à le mobiliser chez les chercheurs et les formateurs. L’analyse transdisciplinaire proposée dans ce texte vise à mieux cerner sa compréhension et à identifier le potentiel de ce concept pour la recherche, le développement et la formation. Le concept de terroir a ainsi été caractérisé par une multiréférentialitée : d’une part un objet représentant un système productif et culturel local, d’autre part un projet d’une communauté dont les finalités et la dynamique sont empreints de subjectivité. Cette multiréférentialité donne au concept de terroir un potentiel pour (i) la médiation dans des projets de développement des territoires ruraux, et (ii) la formation interdisciplinaire des agronomes.

See original: VertigO - la revue électronique en sciences de l'environnement Le terroir, un concept pour l’action dans le développement des territoires

Le Programme d’Acquisition d’Aliments (PAA) au Brésil : l’agriculture locale et familiale au cœur de l’action publique en vue de la sécurité alimentaire

Cet article présente une analyse de la mise en place du Programme d’acquisition d’aliments (PAA) dans les assentamentos ruraux au Brésil. En tant que dispositif de politique publique intégrant l’appui à la commercialisation des produits de l’agriculture familiale et l’aide alimentaire des personnes en difficulté, le PAA représente une innovation considérable en vue de la sécurité alimentaire, en favorisant notamment la constitution de circuits courts de proximité.

Notre étude se concentre sur deux régions dans l’état de São Paulo : d’une part, l'assentamento périurbain Milton Santos qui se situe dans la périphérie de la deuxième plus grande région métropolitaine de cet état, autour de Campinas et, d’autre part, les assentamentos Antônio Conselheiro et Margarida Alves qui se situent à Mirante do Paranapanema dans la région du Pontal do Paranapanema à l’ouest de l’état, loin des grands centres urbains. Pour ces trois assentamentos, nous avons examiné les changements des logiques produ...

See original: VertigO - la revue électronique en sciences de l'environnement Le Programme d’Acquisition d’Aliments (PAA) au Brésil : l’agriculture locale et familiale au cœur de l’action publique en vue de la sécurité alimentaire